Public transit is for the greater good

(2017). American Public Transportation Association  http://www.apta.com/mediacenter/ptbenefits/Pages/FactSheet.aspx

There is no author as this site is a collection of data based on public transportation across the United States and how everybody, whether you use it or not, is benefiting from it. The site provides study results over a wide range of topics from saving money to reducing our carbon footprint. The purpose of this is to show what good public transportation does on a national level within the United States. The intended audience would be workers in the departments of transportation at the national and state governments around the United States. Employees at the government level would find these facts most useful as they would base any proposals they have off of these to help increase or at least maintain these numbers for the future.

Why do we buy cars?

Steele T. (2013). The Pros and Cons of Not Having a Car. https://sustainabilityatspu.wordpress.com/2013/11/16/the-benefits-and-drawbacks-of-not-having-a-car/

Tim Steele wants to showcase that while not owning a car does come with drawbacks, it has benefits that will make you not worry so much about having your own set of car keys. The blog provides observations from a personal perspective about the pros and cons of not being a car owner in the urban landscape of Seattle. The purpose of the article is to allow readers to come to a conclusion about whether or not being a pedestrian is bad in comparison to being a driver. The intended audience would be Seattle area citizens who use public transportation or drive their own vehicle in order to get around the city. First time car buyers in urban areas would find this article rather useful as it would give them some information on how someone similar to them deals with not owning a car and whether or not they really want to buy one now or if they can wait a little bit and use public transport.

Cars will never become overrated

Newman, P., Kosonen, L., & Kenworthy, J. (2016). Theory of urban fabrics: planning the walking, transit/public transport and automobile/motor car cities for reduced car dependency. TPR: Town Planning Review.

Newman, Kosonen, and Kenworthy published this article stating how the current city framework will continue to support the demand for cars through the Liverpool University press. The article contains a combination  of historical facts and results from surveys that compare public transit, walking, and automobile use. The purpose of the article is to highlight how over time the increase of the automobile has led to major cities being less dependent on walking as a form of transportation. The intended audience would be people who live in major cities that own a car or use public transit to get around the city. Leaders in the department of transportation would find this journal rather useful to plan how they want to use public transportation as well as construct sidewalks in major cities across the United States.